Amending Timber Culture Act. by United States. Congress. House. Committee on Public Lands

Cover of: Amending Timber Culture Act. | United States. Congress. House. Committee on Public Lands

Published by [s.n.] in Washington .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Lumber

Edition Notes

Book details

Other titlesAmending timber-culture act
SeriesH.rp.1418
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
Pagination1 p.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL15960658M

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Inthe Timber Culture Act was amended again. This time, the amount of land that had to be covered in trees was reduced from forty acres to ten.

The amendment relaxed the schedule established in the amendments and also made exceptions for trees that had been destroyed by harsh climate or grasshopper plagues.

The Timber Culture Act originally said that if a person planted and nurtured the growth of trees on forty of their acres for ten years, they could claim the land.

The act was amended in to restrict claimants to being over the age of twenty-one (or the head of a household) and a citizen, or soon to be citizen, of the United States.

The Timber Culture Act was a follow-up act to the Homestead Timber Culture Act was passed by Congress in The act allowed homesteaders to get another acres (65 ha) of land if they planted trees on one-fourth of the land, because the land was "almost one entire plain of grass, which is and ever must be useless to cultivating man."Enacted by: the 42nd United States Congress.

CHAP. An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That an act entitled "An act to amend an act entitled ‘An act to encourage the growth of timber on the Western prairies,’" approved June fourteenthFile Size: KB.

Of all the land laws affecting Nebraska, the Timber Culture Act ofdesigned to promote the planting of trees, was perhaps the least successful and subject to many abuses. The Amending Timber Culture Act. book of the act was U.S. Senator Phineas W.

Hitchcock of Nebraska. The Timber Culture Act was repealed in March Originally, a timber claim could be filed by anyone. In the act was amended to require. The Timber Culture Act was repealed in March, Requirements for filing a Timber Culture entry. Originally, a timber claim could be filed by anyone.

Inthe act was amended to require claimants to meet the same age and citizenship qualifications as the pre-emption and homestead acts. Not more than acres could be claimed. The Timber Culture Act was a follow-up act to the Homestead Act. The Timber Culture Act was passed by Congress in The act allowed homesteaders to get another acres of land if they planted trees on one-fourth of the land, because the land was "almost one entire plain of grass, which is and ever must be useless to cultivating man.".

Congress established the Timber Culture Act of on March 3rd. The law as a Western region addition to the Homestead Act of In both laws, settlers had the opportunity to get free land to settle on in new territories acquired by the United States.

Designed to populate areas of the United States, the TCA, and the HA had almost the goals. the Timber Act was amended in by reducing the number of acres to ten.^ A decade later, only 1 1, timber culture claims had Amending Timber Culture Act.

book made in Dakota.^ Because of the lack of restrictive provisions in the act, many fraudulent practices were easily devised.

Actual settlement on the tree claim was not required, Amending Timber Culture Act. book was it necessary to be a. With the exception of the timber culture act, under which, in consideration of planting a few acres of seedlings, settlers on the treeless plains got acres each, the above is the only.

The Timber Culture Act was also amended injust after the Ingalls family’s return to the Plum Creek area: AN ACT TO AMEND AN ACT ENTITLED “AN ACT TO ENCOURAGE THE GROWTH OF TIMBER ON THE WESTERN PRAIRIES.” Forty-Fifth. CHAPTER III PROMOTION OF TIMBER CULTURE, VITALIZATION OF TIMBER EDUCATION, ETC.

Article 9 (Committee on Sustainable Use of Timber) (1)In order to invigorate the sustainable use of timber, a committee on sustainable use of timber (hereinafter Amended by Act. In the decades that followed Congress amended and expanded the scope of homesteading legislation with such supplemental laws as the Timber Culture Act, the Desert Lands Act, and the Expanded Homestead Act.

Over the next hundred years some 2 million applicants tried their hand at homesteading. Inthe Timber Culture Act was amended again. This time, the amount of land that had to be covered in trees was reduced from forty acres to ten. The first U.S.

forest law was the Yellowstone National Park creation in which made it illegal to cut timber within Yellowstone National Park. In the Timber Culture Act passed allowed homesteaders to claim some portions of public land by planting trees on the s: 5.

That nothing in this act shall be construed to repeal section not affected voL 1n. twenty-four of the act entitled "An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, Approved, August 4, Angust 4, CHAP.

An act for the relief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee. Page 15 - TC Mendenhall, chairman of a committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and president of that association, and also the memorial prepared by said committee, relating to the preservation of the forests upon the public domain.

I very earnestly recommend that adequate legislation may be provided to the end that the rapid and needless destruction of our great. paration of this book, the writer ventures the hope that these friends Failure of the Timber Culture Act: Appropriations to Prevent Fraudulent Entries: Abolition of Private Sale in the South: Indirect Unsuccessful Efforts to Repeal or Amend the Timber and Stone Act: The Suspension of Timber and Stone Entries in Sale of Burned.

The Timber Culture Act was enacted in with an amendment in If an ancestor is believed to have filed a timber claim, the records are found in the National Archives and will most likely be found in the land-entry case files.

The Timber Culture Act of granted land to a claimant who was required to plant trees—the tract could be added to an existing homestead claim and had no residency requirement.

The Kinkaid Amendment of granted a full section— acres ( ha)—to new homesteaders settling in western Nebraska.

An amendment to the Homestead Act of. Email this Article. On October 2,John Carraher (predecessor in title of the defendant in error) made application to the local land office at Des Moines, Iowa, to enter the lands under the timber culture act (20 Stat.

at L.chap. His application was rejected and Carraher appealed. The rejection was because of conflict with the railroad grant. President Ulysses S. Grant signed into law an Act Establishing Yellowstone National Park in and the Timber Culture Act in Printed Ephemera: Three Centuries of Broadsides and Other Printed Ephemera.

Nov 7, H.R. (th). To amend the Lacey Act Amendments of to extend its protections to plants illegally harvested outside of the United States, and for other purposes.

Ina database of bills in the U.S. Congress. Timber Culture Repeal Act; History books, newspapers, and other sources use the popular name to refer to these laws.

Why can't these popular names easily be found in the US Code. and might specifically amend, extend, or repeal particular chunks of the existing Code, making it no great challenge to figure out how to classify its various. The Timber Culture Act was a follow-up act to the Homestead Act.

The Timber Culture Act was passed by Congress in The act allowed homesteaders to get another acres (65 ha) of land if they planted trees on one-fourth of the land, because the land was "almost one entire plain of grass, which is and ever must be useless to cultivating man." (qtd.

in Daily Life on the 19th Century. In Congress passed the Timber Culture Act to allow settlers to claim a quarter section of public land ( acres) if they planted a portion of it in trees and could prove the survival of a significant number of those trees after eight years.

The bill was sponsored by Sen. Phineas W. Hitchcock of Nebraska. Septem Preamble Vol. 26 P. Whereas, it is provided by section twenty-four of the Act of Congress, approved March third, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, entitled, "An act to repeal timber-culture laws, and for other purposes," "That the President of the United States may, from time to time, set apart and reserve, in any State or Territory having public land bearing forests.

WASHINGTON, Nov. 26 -- Friends of the irrigation law are disturbed over a bill introduced in the Senate by Senator Hansbrough to amend the Timber and Stone act. The Forest Reserve Act of is a law that gives the President of the United States the authority to unilaterally set aside forest reserves from land in the public domain.

After newspapers began to publicize the fraud and speculation under the previous Timber Culture Act of that granted additional land to homesteaders agreeing to plant trees, scientists of the American Association for.

Timber Culture Act: Gave settlers acre plots of land with cultivated trees (repealed in ) The act was amended in to ban the trading of certain plants and plant products.

Thoreau's book Walden argued in favor of closeness to and affinity for nature and conservation. On October 2,John Carraher (predecessor in title of the defendant in error) made application to the local land office at Des Moines, Iowa, to enter the lands under the timber culture act (20 Stat.

at. There is more about the Timber Culture Act of on these two locations: “Land for trees: The Timber Culture Act of ” on the Minnesota Historical Society website. “Timber Culture Act of ” on the History Nebraska website.

Determining if your relative filed a timber. Get this from a library. The American economy: a historical encyclopedia. [Cynthia Clark Northrup;] -- This comprehensive compilation of short entries, longer topical essays, and primary source documents chronicles the historical development of the United States from an economic perspective.

Few. The Timber Culture Act of was one of the ways that the United States enabled settlers to gain more western land and also helped to create forested areas.

True Explanation: The Timber Culture Act of enabled the settlers the option of taking another acres of land for free if they planted trees on at least one- quarter of it for.

To encourage tree planting and increase the acreage open to entry, Congress passed the Timber Culture Act indeclaring that acres of additional land could be entered by settlers who would devote forty acres to trees. Some 10 million acres were donated under this act, but fraud prevented substantive tree growth.

The act was repealed in. The Timber Culture Act was a follow-up act to the Homestead Act. The Timber Culture Act was passed by Congress in The act allowed homesteaders to get another acres (65 ha) of land if they planted trees on one-fourth of the land, because the land was "almost one entire plain of grass, which is and ever must be useless to cultivating man.".

The original Act contained no provision whatsoever for forest reserves. It repealed several Acts, including the Timber Culture Act of and all pre-emption laws. [The Timber Culture Act granted a homesteader a patent to acres of land in the Great Plains if.

The Timber and Stone Act, when originally enacted, in June,related solely to public lands within particular states. 20 Stat.p. Inhowever, that act was amended by striking out the designation of particular states, thus causing the act to apply to "surveyed public lands of the United States within the public land states.".

The Timber Culture Act of granted land to people who were required to plant trees. The Kinkaid Amendment of granted acres of land to homesteaders who settled in Western Nebraska.

The Enlarged Homestead Act passed in doubled the amount of acres given to the claimants. Congress passed a number of laws encouraging white settler colonialism in these new lands, including the Homestead Act, the Timber Culture Act, the Desert Land Act, and the Dawes Act. Much of the available land—and, necessarily, much of the ensuing violence—was on or near the newly-demarcated U.S.-Mexico border.

The amendment also introduces a new category of forests — production forest. These will be forests with specific objectives for production of timber, pulp, pulpwood, firewood, non-timber forest produce, medicinal plants or any forest species to increase production in the country for a specified period.

Indian Forest Act, The Timber Culture Act of granted land to a claimant who was required to plant trees—the tract could be added to an existing homestead claim and had no residency requirement. The Kinkaid Amendment of granted a full section ( acres) to new homesteaders settling in .

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